Introduction

Terrariums are landscapes that are grown in a glass. Just like aquariums house water, terrariums house terrain. They are fascinating, educational and assist in understanding the principles to sustaining life. There are no limits to what you can plant inside a terrarium. To date we have conquered desert, woodland and tropical terrains, with others in the pipeline. The key to building a long-lasting terrarium is to understand the terrain and plant-life you are growing and replicate it within the glass.

Types of Landscapes

Desert

For Succulents & Desert Plants

Drainage Base

The base of the terrarium is designed to drain excess water. This allows water to escape quickly to ensure the soil and roots of the plants are kept dry, just like in their natural environment.

Soil Type

Fast draining, sandy soil.

Placement

Sunny, well ventilated areas.

Watering

Water lightly once every 3~5 days, depending on your environment. Ensure there is a dry period between watering. Succulents hate having ‘wet feet.’

Woodland

For Bonsai, Air plants & Moss

Self Watering Base

Woodland terrariums utilise a self-watering base. The base is filled with water which, through capillary action, keeps the soil moist to prevent it from drying out.

Soil Type

Bonsai soil with drainage properties.

Placement

Areas that are well ventilated and receive the morning sun.

Watering

Keep base filled with water and mist 1~2 times a day depending on your environment. Change the water in the base once a week with spring or rain water.

River

For Carnivorous plants or Aquatic plants

Water Base

A water proof terrarium with a center compartment with allows for plants to be gorwn in the centre of the glass. Opening are installed to ensure air movement

Soil Type

Sphagnum moss with no nuitrients.

Placement

Full sun area

Watering

Replace water biweekly with spring or rain water.

Planting

Crushed Pebbles

These crushed pebbles are the perfect size to allow for capillary action and prevent the soil from becoming too moist.

 

Bonsai Soil

Bonsai soil is a fast draining soil that holds just the right combination of soil and organic matter to prevent soil from becoming too wet or too dry.

 

Feature Plant

Place the plant in the desired position. Ensure you mist the exposed roots to prevent them from drying out while you are planting them.

 

Feature Rock

Place the larger rock in the right location to help accent the landscape. Be sure to anchor the rock deep into the soil to prevent the rock from bouncing around.

 

Companion Plant

You may have a ground fern or air-plant to accompany the landscape. Air plants should be mounted onto drift wood using wire to ensure the stay airborne.

 

Moss

Live moss should be sprayed first before placing it into the terrarium. Break off the right size and cover the desired area. Moss is not easy to keep alive, so keep any leftovers for refreshing purposes.

 

Crushed Tigers Eye

This crushed gemstone is not only beautiful but also allows for diversity in the landscape. Use this to cover other areas where there is no moss and ensure there is minimal exposure of soil to prevent water loss.

 

Self Watering Base

Fill the base tray with water half way, this will activate the self-watering function as water wicks its way up through the pebbles into the soil. Clean the base once a week as limescale and waste can gather over time.

 

Crushed Pebbles

These crushed pebbles are the perfect size to allow for capillary action to take place and prevents soil from being spoiled by water.

Succulent Soil

Succulent soil is fast draining soil that hold more sand allowing water to drain quickly as succulents hate wet feet. It’s wise to pre-wet the soil to make easy planting.

Feature Plant

Place the plant in the desired position. Ensure you mist the exposed roots to prevent them from drying out while you are placing them.

 

Feature Rock

Place the larger rock in the right location to help accent the landscape. Be sure to anchor the rock deep into the soil to prevent the rock from bouncing around.

 

Companion Plant

Pack the companion plants close to one another as succulents look best when they are clumped together. Use the back of the brush to dig holes and brush the soil back to cover the roots.

 

Crushed Tigers Eye

This crushed gemstone is not only beautiful but also allows for diversity for the landscape. Use this to cover other areas where moss is not and ensure there minimal exposure of soil to prevent water loss.

 

Drainage Base

Place the terrarium over the base as the base catches excess water to percent damage to the surface the terrarium is on.

 

Watering Note

Spray the water onto the plants lightly, just enough to penetrate the roots but not enough to drown them. Allow for a 3 days dry period before next watering. You can see the soil water level through the glass.

 

Placement

Good placement

Bad placement

Semi-Shaded Outdoor Patio

Outdoor patios are probably the best place to keep terrariums. As long as they are not placed in full sun for extended periods of time.

 

Sunny Windows

These bright, naturally light areas provide shelter from harsh environmental elements, like the wind, while still exposing the terrarium to enough sunlight, allowing it to grow and flourish.

 

Tables near windows

Terrariums as centrepieces make great features but ensure that they receive enough sunlight.

 

Kitchen

Terrarium herb greenhouses make great additions to the kitchen. Just ensure you don’t place it near heat inducing appliances like ovens or kettles.

Tables Low Light Areas

This may seem like a good place but being too far away from the sunlight may mean that your terrarium will not receive enough sunlight to allow for photosynthesis. The terrarium then enters a state of dormancy.

 

Corners Tables

Corner of walls tend to be a dead zone for plants. You’ll notice plants don’t’ really grow well in these areas as there is little air flow. This can cause constant humidity and low temperatures.

 

Toilets

Bathrooms are generally dark and damp rooms as windows are either small or frosted and the humidity from hot water usage is high. Contrary to popular belief, these rooms are not good places for terrariums, as they will not receive enough natural sunlight and mould may form.

No Light Areas

Do not place a terrarium or any plant in an area where there is no light. It’s a sure fire way to cut short their life expectancy.

 

More Help?

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